Aging

Senior Moments Oldest Senior

Leandra Becerra Lumbreras, born in northeast Mexico, claims to have been born on Aug. 31, 1887 – meaning she turned 127 on Sunday and that would make her the oldest human being ever on the face of the earth. She is still able to chat and has some mobility despite her deafness and severe cataracts, EFE reports.

She celebrated her birthday over the weekend in the company of some of her 153 descendants. They made sure she got enough rest and was awake for the event: these days this witness to three centuries usually sleeps in 72-hour periods, relatives say.

My dad, Andrew Frank Hatch, will be 116 next month, so living a long life is something I know a little something about.  People often ask the much repeated question, “How does he do it?” My father always says his longevity is due to the man upstairs and I will add that having loving family is the next important ingredient.  I hope you enjoy this article endorsed by the National Institute of Aging that can perhaps shed light on the aging process.

Just like millions of Americans, the National Institute on Aging’s (NIA) Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) celebrates its 50th birthday in 2008. The study was the first to ask a most basic question: What is normal aging?

There is still much to learn, but so far two major conclusions can be drawn from BLSA data. First, “normal” aging can be distinguished from disease. Although people’s bodies change and can in some ways decline over time, these changes do not inevitably lead to diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, or dementia. A number of disorders that typically occur in old age are a result of disease processes, not normal aging.

Second, no single, chronological timetable of human aging exists. We all age differently. In fact, in terms of change and development, there are more differences among older people than among younger people. Genetics, lifestyle, and disease processes affect the rate of aging between and within all individuals.

These fundamental changes in our thinking about age and disease have led the BLSA and the field of aging research in important new directions. As we further pinpoint the influences on how we age, we can also think about new and more effective interventions that may prevent disease and promote healthy aging.

You can find the complete BLSA booklet at this website http://www.nia.nih.gov/sites/default/files/healthy_aging_lessons_from_the_baltimore_longitudinal_study_of_aging.pdf

- Healthy Aging: Lessons from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

 

 

Mill Valley Attracts Seniors

Mill Valley, a small, charming town, located a few miles north of San Francisco, is perfect for senior visitors who enjoy history, museums and the arts.  Fodor’s calls the town “chic and woodsy.” Two financial magazines, MONEY and CNN/Money, named Mill Valley “One ...

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Medicare to Help Seniors Choose Health Care Providers with Five-Star Ratings

By Dr. Patrick Conway, CMS Deputy Administrator for Innovation and Quality,  Chief Medical Officer June 27, 2014 - When buying a product or service, looking at ratings can often help narrow down the choices. Some websites offer “star” ratings that give information ...

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The Working Caregiver: Issues Faced With Working & Caregiving

        Many adult children find it financially impossible to leave their current employer and give up a much needed salary to take care of an aging adult.  Caregivers are the most effective and efficient when they arm themselves with as much information as possible about their ...

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Fall Prevention

  Annually, one in every three adults ages 65 or older will falls and 2 million are treated in emergency departments for fall-related injuries. And the risk of falling increases with each decade of life. The long-term consequences of fall injuries, such as hip ...

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Emergency Preparedness Presented by Collaborating Agencies Responding to Disaster.

On Monday, March 10th a 6.9 earthquake struck offshore in Northern California near Eureka. While no one was injured this event conjures up thoughts about "the Big One" or some other disasters we should prepare for. Our next guest speaker will help us explore these and other questions regarding emergency preparedness.

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Senior Moments Salutes Black History Month

              Our February Senior Moments meeting will include African American's sharing  personal stories.  We will also hear presentations about those who contributed to the fabric of this nation. We encourage all attendees to bring cards since we often have elders who attend our meetings who are in ...

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Senior Moments Holiday Mixer & Potluck Lunch

December’s Meeting Agenda: While we will network, eat and enjoy our time together, we will also finalize our toy drive and hear words of encouragement from Chaplin Betty Clark about chasing away the holiday blues. For many, this time of the year is difficult to deal with, especially those who grieve the loss of a loved ...

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Senior Moments Wants to Know…

How is Your Hearing? Hearing Loss, Hearing Aid Technology, & Effective Communication Strategies with Hard of Hearing People Presented by Senior Moments November’s Guest Speaker: Dr. Mimi Salamat, Ph.D. Clinical Audiologist & Tinnitus Specialist Dr. Mimi will be explaining basic anatomy and physiology of the auditory system, different types of hearing loss, signs ...

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Senior Moments Salute To Partner Luncheon

After 8 years in existence without outside funding Senior Moments,an all volunteer program, is delighted to host its first fundraiser and luncheon! While we are proud we did not required funding to operate for this length of time, our current growth warrants the need for resources ...

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